pve-firewall.adoc: remove wrong continuation mark
[pve-docs.git] / pve-firewall.adoc
1 ifdef::manvolnum[]
2 PVE({manvolnum})
3 ================
4 include::attributes.txt[]
5
6 NAME
7 ----
8
9 pve-firewall - The PVE Firewall Daemon
10
11
12 SYNOPSYS
13 --------
14
15 include::pve-firewall.8-synopsis.adoc[]
16
17
18 DESCRIPTION
19 -----------
20 endif::manvolnum[]
21
22 ifndef::manvolnum[]
23 {pve} Firewall
24 ==============
25 include::attributes.txt[]
26 endif::manvolnum[]
27
28 // Copied from pve wiki: Revision as of 08:45, 9 November 2015
29
30 Proxmox VE Firewall provides an easy way to protect your IT
31 infrastructure. You can easily setup firewall rules for all hosts
32 inside a cluster, or define rules for virtual machines and
33 containers. Features like firewall macros, security groups, IP sets
34 and aliases help making that task easier.
35
36 While all configuration is stored on the cluster file system, the
37 iptables based firewall runs on each cluster node, and thus provides
38 full isolation between virtual machines. The distributed nature of
39 this system also provides much higher bandwidth than a central
40 firewall solution.
41
42 NOTE: If you enable the firewall, all traffic is blocked by default,
43 except WebGUI(8006) and ssh(22) from your local network.
44
45 The firewall has full support for IPv4 and IPv6. IPv6 support is fully
46 transparent, and we filter traffic for both protocols by default. So
47 there is no need to maintain a different set of rules for IPv6.
48
49
50 Zones
51 -----
52
53 The Proxmox VE firewall groups the network into the following logical zones:
54
55 Host::
56
57 Traffic from/to a cluster node
58
59 VM::
60
61 Traffic from/to a specific VM
62
63 For each zone, you can define firewall rules for incoming and/or
64 outgoing traffic.
65
66
67 Configuration Files
68 -------------------
69
70 All firewall related configuration is stored on the proxmox cluster
71 file system. So those files are automatically distributed to all
72 cluster nodes, and the 'pve-firewall' service updates the underlying
73 iptables rules automatically on changes. Any configuration can be
74 done using the GUI (i.e. Datacenter -> Firewall -> Options tab (tabs
75 at the bottom of the page), or on a Node -> Firewall), so the
76 following configuration file snippets are just for completeness.
77
78 All firewall configuration files contains sections of key-value
79 pairs. Lines beginning with a '#' and blank lines are considered
80 comments. Sections starts with a header line containing the section
81 name enclosed in '[' and ']'.
82
83 Cluster Wide Setup
84 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
85
86 The cluster wide firewall configuration is stored at:
87  
88  /etc/pve/firewall/cluster.fw
89
90 The configuration can contain the following sections:
91
92 '[OPTIONS]'::
93
94 This is used to set cluster wide firewall options.
95
96 NOTE: The firewall is completely disabled by default, so you need to
97 set the enable option here:
98
99 ----
100 [OPTIONS]
101 # enable firewall (cluster wide setting, default is disabled)
102 enable: 1
103 ----
104
105 '[RULES]'::
106
107 This sections contains cluster wide firewall rules for all nodes.
108
109 '[IPSET <name>]'::
110
111 Cluster wide IP set definitions.
112
113 '[GROUP <name>]'::
114
115 Cluster wide security group definitions.
116
117 '[ALIASES]'::
118
119 Cluster wide Alias definitions.
120
121 Host specific Configuration
122 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
123
124 Host related configuration is read from:
125
126  /etc/pve/nodes/<nodename>/host.fw
127
128 This is useful if you want to overwrite rules from 'cluster.fw'
129 config. You can also increase log verbosity, and set netfilter related
130 options.
131
132
133 VM/Container configuration
134 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
135
136 VM firewall configuration is read from:
137
138  /etc/pve/firewall/<VMID>.fw
139
140 and contains the following data:
141
142 * IP set definitions
143 * Alias definitions
144 * Firewall rules for this VM
145 * VM specific options
146
147
148 Enabling the Firewall for VMs and Containers
149 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
150
151 You need to enable the firewall on the virtual network interface configuration
152 in addition to the general 'Enable Firewall' option in the 'Options' tab.
153
154
155 Firewall Rules
156 --------------
157
158 Firewall rules consists of a direction (`IN` or `OUT`) and an
159 action (`ACCEPT`, `DENY`, `REJECT`). You can also specify a macro
160 name. Macros contain predifined sets of rules and options. Rules can be disabled by prefixing them with '|'.
161
162 .Firewall rules syntax
163 ----
164 [RULES]
165
166 DIRECTION ACTION [OPTIONS]
167 |DIRECTION ACTION [OPTIONS] # disabled rule
168
169 DIRECTION MACRO(ACTION) [OPTIONS] # use predefined macro
170 ----
171
172 The following options can be used to refine rule matches. 
173
174 include::pve-firewall-rules-opts.adoc[]
175
176 Here are some examples:
177
178 ----
179 [RULES]
180 IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0
181 IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0 # a comment
182 IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0 -source 192.168.2.192 # only allow SSH from 192.168.2.192
183 IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0 -source 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.10 # accept SSH for ip range
184 IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0 -source 10.0.0.1,10.0.0.2,10.0.0.3 #accept ssh for ip list
185 IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0 -source +mynetgroup # accept ssh for ipset mynetgroup
186 IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0 -source myserveralias #accept ssh for alias myserveralias
187
188 |IN SSH(ACCEPT) -i net0 # disabled rule
189
190 IN  DROP # drop all incoming packages
191 OUT ACCEPT # accept all outgoing packages
192 ----
193
194 Security Groups
195 ---------------
196
197 A security group is a collection of rules, defined at cluster level, which
198 can be used in all VMs' rules. For example you can define a group named
199 `webserver` with rules to open the http and https ports.
200
201 ----
202 # /etc/pve/firewall/cluster.fw
203
204 [group webserver]
205 IN  ACCEPT -p tcp -dport 80
206 IN  ACCEPT -p tcp -dport 443
207 ----
208
209 Then, you can add this group to a VM's firewall
210
211 ----
212 # /etc/pve/firewall/<VMID>.fw
213
214 [RULES]
215 GROUP webserver
216 ----
217
218
219 IP Aliases
220 ----------
221
222 IP Aliases allow you to associate IP addresses of networks with a
223 name. You can then refer to those names:
224
225 * inside IP set definitions
226 * in `source` and `dest` properties of firewall rules
227
228 Standard IP alias `local_network`
229 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
230
231 This alias is automatically defined. Please use the following command
232 to see assigned values:
233
234 ----
235 # pve-firewall localnet
236 local hostname: example
237 local IP address: 192.168.2.100
238 network auto detect: 192.168.0.0/20
239 using detected local_network: 192.168.0.0/20
240 ----
241
242 The firewall automatically sets up rules to allow everything needed
243 for cluster communication (corosync, API, SSH) using this alias.
244
245 The user can overwrite these values in the cluster.fw alias
246 section. If you use a single host on a public network, it is better to
247 explicitly assign the local IP address
248
249 ----
250 #  /etc/pve/firewall/cluster.fw
251 [ALIASES]
252 local_network 1.2.3.4 # use the single ip address
253 ----
254
255 IP Sets
256 -------
257
258 IP sets can be used to define groups of networks and hosts. You can
259 refer to them with `+name` in the firewall rules' `source` and `dest`
260 properties.
261
262 The following example allows HTTP traffic from the `management` IP
263 set.
264
265  IN HTTP(ACCEPT) -source +management
266
267 Standard IP set `management`
268 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
269
270 This IP set applies only to host firewalls (not VM firewalls).  Those
271 ips are allowed to do normal management tasks (PVE GUI, VNC, SPICE,
272 SSH).
273
274 The local cluster network is automatically added to this IP set (alias
275 `cluster_network`), to enable inter-host cluster
276 communication. (multicast,ssh,...)
277
278 ----
279 # /etc/pve/firewall/cluster.fw
280
281 [IPSET management] 
282 192.168.2.10
283 192.168.2.10/24
284 ----
285
286 Standard IP set 'blacklist'
287 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
288
289 Traffic from these ips is dropped by every host's and VM's firewall.
290
291 ----
292 # /etc/pve/firewall/cluster.fw
293
294 [IPSET blacklist] 
295 77.240.159.182
296 213.87.123.0/24
297 ----
298
299 [[ipfilter-section]]
300 Standard IP set 'ipfilter-net*'
301 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
302
303 These filters belong to a VM's network interface and are mainly used to prevent
304 IP spoofing. If such a set exists for an interface then any outgoing traffic
305 with a source IP not matching its interface's corresponding ipfilter set will
306 be dropped.
307
308 For containers with configured IP addresses these sets, if they exist (or are
309 activated via the general `IP Filter` option in the VM's firewall's 'options'
310 tab), implicitly contain the associated IP addresses.
311
312 For both virtual machines and containers they also implicitly contain the
313 standard MAC-derived IPv6 link-local address in order to allow the neighbor
314 discovery protocol to work.
315
316 ----
317 /etc/pve/firewall/<VMID>.fw
318
319 [IPSET ipfilter-net0] # only allow specified IPs on net0
320 192.168.2.10
321 ----
322
323
324 Services and Commands
325 ---------------------
326
327 The firewall runs two service daemons on each node:
328
329 * pvefw-logger: NFLOG daemon (ulogd replacement).
330 * pve-firewall: updates iptables rules
331
332 There is also a CLI command named 'pve-firewall', which can be used to
333 start and stop the firewall service:
334
335  # pve-firewall start
336  # pve-firewall stop
337
338 To get the status use:
339
340  # pve-firewall status
341
342 The above command reads and compiles all firewall rules, so you will
343 see warnings if your firewall configuration contains any errors.
344
345 If you want to see the generated iptables rules you can use:
346
347  # iptables-save
348
349
350 Tips and Tricks
351 ---------------
352
353 How to allow FTP
354 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
355
356 FTP is an old style protocol which uses port 21 and several other dynamic ports. So you
357 need a rule to accept port 21. In addition, you need to load the 'ip_conntrack_ftp' module.
358 So please run: 
359
360  modprobe ip_conntrack_ftp
361
362 and add `ip_conntrack_ftp` to '/etc/modules' (so that it works after a reboot) .
363
364
365 Suricata IPS integration
366 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
367
368 If you want to use the http://suricata-ids.org/[Suricata IPS]
369 (Intrusion Prevention System), it's possible.
370
371 Packets will be forwarded to the IPS only after the firewall ACCEPTed
372 them.
373
374 Rejected/Dropped firewall packets don't go to the IPS.
375
376 Install suricata on proxmox host:
377
378 ----
379 # apt-get install suricata
380 # modprobe nfnetlink_queue  
381 ----
382
383 Don't forget to add `nfnetlink_queue` to '/etc/modules' for next reboot.
384
385 Then, enable IPS for a specific VM with:
386
387 ----
388 # /etc/pve/firewall/<VMID>.fw
389
390 [OPTIONS]
391 ips: 1
392 ips_queues: 0
393 ----
394
395 `ips_queues` will bind a specific cpu queue for this VM.
396
397 Available queues are defined in
398
399 ----
400 # /etc/default/suricata
401 NFQUEUE=0
402 ----
403
404 Avoiding link-local addresses on tap and veth devices
405 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
406
407 With IPv6 enabled by default every interface gets a MAC-derived link local
408 address. However, most devices on a typical {pve} setup are connected to a
409 bridge and so the bridge is the only interface which really needs one.
410
411 To disable a link local address on an interface you can set the interface's
412 `disable_ipv6` sysconf variable. Despite the name, this does not prevent IPv6
413 traffic from passing through the interface when routing or bridging, so the
414 only noticeable effect will be the removal of the link local address.
415
416 The easiest method of achieving this setting for all newly started VMs is to
417 set it for the `default` interface configuration and enabling it explicitly on
418 the interfaces which need it. This is also the case for other settings such as
419 `forwarding`, `accept_ra` or `autoconf`.
420
421 Here's a possible setup:
422 ----
423 # /etc/sysconf.d/90-ipv6.conf
424
425 net.ipv6.conf.default.forwarding = 0
426 net.ipv6.conf.default.proxy_ndp = 0
427 net.ipv6.conf.default.autoconf = 0
428 net.ipv6.conf.default.disable_ipv6 = 1
429 net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_ra = 0
430
431 net.ipv6.conf.lo.disable_ipv6 = 0
432 ----
433
434 ----
435 # /etc/network/interfaces
436 (...)
437 iface vmbr0 inet6 static
438     address fc00::31
439     netmask 16
440     gateway fc00::1
441     accept_ra 0
442     pre-up echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv6/conf/$IFACE/disable_ipv6
443 (...)
444 ----
445
446
447 Notes on IPv6
448 -------------
449
450 The firewall contains a few IPv6 specific options. One thing to note is that
451 IPv6 does not use the ARP protocol anymore, and instead uses NDP (Neighbor
452 Discovery Protocol) which works on IP level and thus needs IP addresses to
453 succeed. For this purpose link-local addresses derived from the interface's MAC
454 address are used. By default the 'NDP' option is enabled on both host and VM
455 level to allow neighbor discovery (NDP) packets to be sent and received.
456
457 Beside neighbor discovery NDP is also used for a couple of other things, like
458 autoconfiguration and advertising routers.
459
460 By default VMs are allowed to send out router solicitation messages (to query
461 for a router), and to receive router advetisement packets. This allows them to
462 use stateless auto configuration. On the other hand VMs cannot advertise
463 themselves as routers unless the 'Allow Router Advertisement' (`radv: 1`) option
464 is set.
465
466 As for the link local addresses required for NDP, there's also an 'IP Filter'
467 (`ipfilter: 1`) option which can be enabled which has the same effect as adding
468 an `ipfilter-net*` ipset for each of the VM's network interfaces containing the
469 corresponding link local addresses.  (See the
470 <<ipfilter-section,Standard IP set 'ipfilter-net*'>> section for details.)
471
472
473 Ports used by Proxmox VE
474 ------------------------
475
476 * Web interface: 8006
477 * VNC Web console: 5900-5999
478 * SPICE proxy: 3128
479 * sshd (used for cluster actions): 22
480 * rpcbind: 111
481 *  corosync multicast (if you run a cluster): 5404, 5405 UDP
482
483
484 ifdef::manvolnum[]
485
486 Macro Definitions
487 -----------------
488
489 include::pve-firewall-macros.adoc[]
490
491
492 include::pve-copyright.adoc[]
493
494 endif::manvolnum[]