Add General Settings sub chapter
authorEmmanuel Kasper <e.kasper@proxmox.com>
Wed, 30 Nov 2016 14:18:36 +0000 (15:18 +0100)
committerDietmar Maurer <dietmar@proxmox.com>
Wed, 30 Nov 2016 16:33:19 +0000 (17:33 +0100)
We will use this to document the first tab of the Create CT wizard.

Also move the priviledged/unpriviledge explanation here, since
the related checkbox will be placed in this tab.

pct.adoc

index 1170ad1..12b9765 100644 (file)
--- a/pct.adoc
+++ b/pct.adoc
@@ -102,32 +102,7 @@ virtualized VMs provide better isolation.
 
 The good news is that LXC uses many kernel security features like
 AppArmor, CGroups and PID and user namespaces, which makes containers
 
 The good news is that LXC uses many kernel security features like
 AppArmor, CGroups and PID and user namespaces, which makes containers
-usage quite secure. We distinguish two types of containers:
-
-
-Privileged Containers
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Security is done by dropping capabilities, using mandatory access
-control (AppArmor), SecComp filters and namespaces. The LXC team
-considers this kind of container as unsafe, and they will not consider
-new container escape exploits to be security issues worthy of a CVE
-and quick fix. So you should use this kind of containers only inside a
-trusted environment, or when no untrusted task is running as root in
-the container.
-
-
-Unprivileged Containers
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-This kind of containers use a new kernel feature called user
-namespaces. The root UID 0 inside the container is mapped to an
-unprivileged user outside the container. This means that most security
-issues (container escape, resource abuse, ...) in those containers
-will affect a random unprivileged user, and so would be a generic
-kernel security bug rather than an LXC issue. The LXC team thinks
-unprivileged containers are safe by design.
-
+usage quite secure.
 
 Guest Operating System Configuration
 ------------------------------------
 
 Guest Operating System Configuration
 ------------------------------------
@@ -349,6 +324,49 @@ group/others model.
 Container Settings
 ------------------
 
 Container Settings
 ------------------
 
+[[pct_general]]
+General Settings
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+General settings of a container include
+
+* the *Node* : the physical server on which the container will run
+* the *CT ID*: a unique number in this {pve} installation used to identify your container
+* *Hostname*: the hostname of the container
+* *Resource Pool*: a logical group of containers and VMs
+* *Password*: the root password of the container
+* *SSH Public Key*: a public key for connecting to the root account over SSH
+* *Unprivileged container*: this option allows to choose at creation time
+if you want to create a privileged or unprivileged container.
+
+
+Privileged Containers
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+Security is done by dropping capabilities, using mandatory access
+control (AppArmor), SecComp filters and namespaces. The LXC team
+considers this kind of container as unsafe, and they will not consider
+new container escape exploits to be security issues worthy of a CVE
+and quick fix. So you should use this kind of containers only inside a
+trusted environment, or when no untrusted task is running as root in
+the container.
+
+
+Unprivileged Containers
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+
+This kind of containers use a new kernel feature called user
+namespaces. The root UID 0 inside the container is mapped to an
+unprivileged user outside the container. This means that most security
+issues (container escape, resource abuse, ...) in those containers
+will affect a random unprivileged user, and so would be a generic
+kernel security bug rather than an LXC issue. The LXC team thinks
+unprivileged containers are safe by design.
+
+NOTE: If the container uses systemd as an init system, please be
+aware the systemd version running inside the container should be equal
+or greater than 220.
+
 [[pct_cpu]]
 CPU
 ~~~
 [[pct_cpu]]
 CPU
 ~~~